Half of a Yellow Sun | Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie

 
Half of a Yellow Sun | Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie
 

I first heard about Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie in July of 2014 when a friend of mine sent me a link to her now tremendously famous TED talk on feminism. KB, I can't thank you enough for introducing her into my life back then. In the months that followed I went on to watch many of her other speeches and interviews, and grew increasingly fond of her wisdom. Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie became one of my role models.

But there was one thing still lacking. Up until November that same year I hadn't read any of her literary works. Her books were not easy to come by in Russia, but by sheer serendipity I got my hands on Half of a Yellow Sun and Americanah, and decided to start with the former.

I expected a lot from the book. But this novel turned out to be so much more than I ever anticipated. An important, poignant story, something people should know about and never forget, an all-encompassing encyclopedia of human emotions, a story of love and war. This, I guess, is the perfect example of what the author calls 'emotional truth of fiction', the driving force behind 'humanizing history'.

A masterpiece that nourished my then new-found thirst for reading, Half of a Yellow Sun also became a source of inspiration for me. It urged me to study the history of Nigeria and other African nations, to eradicate my ignorance that comes from living in the world where African voices are barely heard—to avoid what Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie calls 'the danger of a single story'. I recommend this book to everyone, and I'm sure you will enjoy it and learn a lot.