When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost | Joan Morgan

 
When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost | Joan Morgan
 

When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost by Joan Morgan is not a book about my world—I’m white and male, born nearly a generation later and half a globe away, and old-school hip-hop never was the backdrop to my coming-of-age story. But I feel lucky to be able to look out the window that Joan Morgan opens to her reader, to observe and learn, to connect the dots and see how it all relates to here and now. Her message is as relevant as it was back in 1999, and her prose is finer than most poetry I’ve ever read, all while staying honest and real.

Hip-hop feminism is a response to some of the deepest flaws in the movement and its legacy. It’s the result of Joan Morgan’s search for the kind of feminism that she can call her own—the one that doesn’t exclusively serve the interests of straight white women, or only inhabits the halls of academia and the pages of research papers, or offers independence and empowerment at the cost of giving up the most intimate of the heart’s desires, those that got caught up in the crossfire of money, sex and power. It’s also interesting to see how Joan Morgan and Roxane Gay both explore the complicated and problematic relationship between feminism and hip-hop, but take it in entirely different directions.

No matter who you are and where you come from, I’m sure there’s a lot you can learn from this book. And while you’re at it, relish Joan Morgan’s beautiful writing, you won’t find it anywhere else.